Friday, 24 March 2017

the smiths

Thinking of every Smiths song I like, there isn't one I wouldn't prefer with Morrissey's vocals taken off.

Monday, 20 March 2017

what would an atheist do?

I've started reading Rumours Of Another World, by Philip Yancey. Here's an interesting early paragraph:

'No society in history has attempted to live without a belief in the sacred, not until the modern West. Such a leap has consequences that we are only beginning to recognize. We now live in a state of confusion about the big questions that have always engaged the human race, questions of meaning, purpose, and morality. A sceptical friend of mine used to ask himself the question, "What would an atheist do?" in deliberate mockery of the What Would Jesus Do (WWJD) slogan. He finally stopped asking because he found no reliable answers.'

Saturday, 11 March 2017

the comforters

On Tuesday I finished The Comforters by Muriel Spark. It was her first novel, which I'd never heard of before seeing the list of her novels on Wikipedia a while ago, in relation to doing a page for Not To Disturb, which I'd never heard of before seeing and buying it. In fact, given what a notable novelist she is, there were a surprising number of novels I'd never heard of, below the big hitters.

I enjoyed it rather more than I'd expected, for a first novel I'd never heard of from a big name, after not being impressed by Memento Mori, which is one of the big hitters. I liked the quirkiness of it, especially the idea of the character who felt she was in a novel, in itself not unheard of psychiatrically, and her relationship with the novelist she could hear typing; that wasn't fully resolved or explained, but that annoyed me less than similar effects in Memento Mori and Not To Disturb. It was plot-packed, some of it I think deliberately daft because of the 'in a novel' theme. (I guess the title is a reference to Job's comforters, but if it is I don't get it much.) So, certainly my favourite of hers I've read apart from The Prime. (Her novels are not very long, which also makes me happier to give others a go after ones I've not been so keen on.

Friday, 10 March 2017

greenbelt - reflections

In broad summary, I'd say going to Greenbelt last year, my first actual camping festival, was a pleasant surprise in terms of the practicalities (as covered in the previous post, and not least due to having Susannah there to help make it a good experience for us), was rather disappointing and unremarkable on the whole as a music festival (as also covered in the previous post), and was depressing as a Christian festival.

greenbelt - music and events

We were at Greenbelt, Friday 26th August - Monday 29th August last year. This is what I did.

Wednesday, 8 March 2017

grinding down

Seven tweets:
It grinds you down that not only do more+more people think you and your church are misogynistic homophobes, but more+more Christians do too.

look, they're Christians like you and they don't believe that; clearly your reasons are misogynistic/homophobic, not theology.

& ultimately those perceptions of what is acceptable within church traditions move out of general use and into legislation.

But it's the personal sense of it that is the hardest, of course, rather than all the large-scale levels beyond you.

as the box within which you and your fellows are gets smaller and more painful, your boxy little heart gets crushed too.

and the gulf of understanding between your heart and those around you gets larger, as the shared starting points get smaller.

[everyone competes to play world's smallest violin for the self-pitying misogynist homophobe; oh poor you]

Sunday, 5 March 2017

sing

On Saturday afternoon (4th March), Maisie and I saw Sing at the Genesis Cinema. It was quite good, and we enjoyed it. It wasn't groundbreaking, but told a familiar story well, with good music and good humour.

Saturday, 4 March 2017

twilight: breaking dawn - part ii

On Monday 27th February Maisie and I watched the last of the Twilight films, Breaking Dawn Part II. It was fine, and not as dull as Part I. Having seen all the films now, Maisie has just started reading the books. I'd guess that she won't be that bothered about watching those films again, unlike, say, the Harry Potter films. I certainly wouldn't bother watching them again.

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

morris folk club - february

At the Morris Folk Club on Tuesday I sang four times, unusually.

I sang Three Craws to start with, mainly to teach it (or at least expose it) to the choir: it's one of the songs in the choir's current bird-themed set, and was one of my suggestions. I reminded them that when Fiona and I had led a choir rehearsal she summed up our teaching style quite accurately as, 'We've sung it to you twice - how come you don't know it yet?' But it's a pretty simple song, and it went fine (I wrote a key word from each of the crow verses on my hand so I didn't forget them while I was teaching it).

Then I sang Nathan Jones, which is short, and went fine.

In the second half, Tanja, Ginny and I sang The Parting Glass (in the Voice Squad's three-part version, as we'd done with others in a small group in the choir's drink-themed concert), and I think that went rather well, if I do say so myself.

Finally I sang Making Time, which is the song of Tim's which I'd picked up and meddled with the words to (it was a lovely tune, but he had felt the words were somewhat unfinished and was happy for me to have a go at). It's the fourth time I've sung it in public, also unusually for me - at Morris, then at Sharp's, then at Tooting. People have responded well to it; it's a good song. I sang it particularly last night because it was Tim's last time at folk club before leaving for Devon.

Full set list here.